Plant Collections

Botanic gardens hold collections of plants for scientific, educative, conservation and aesthetic purposes. They play a role helping scientists and the public understand the history, present day uses and what the future may hold for plants in natural environments.  Internationally, botanic gardens are living museums that hold individual specimens or collections of plants for scientific, educative, conservation and aesthetic purposes.

Botanic gardens throughout the world play a significant role in helping scientists and the public understand the evolution and history of plants, their present day uses as well as what the future may hold for plants in natural environments.

The living plant collections of the Royal Botanic Gardens (RBG) are held at two sites, the historic RBG Melbourne garden in South Yarra, and the bushland and native Australian Garden of the RBG Cranbourne site.

The living plant collections at Melbourne are incorporated within the framework of a garden that has been skilfully designed in the nineteenth-century picturesque and gardenesque landscape styles.

The Gardens still retain the bold design style introduced by William Guilfoyle while he was Director between 1873 and 1909. This style contributes strongly to the international reputation of Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne.

The Australian Garden at RBG Cranbourne is a place where visitors can immerse themselves in Australian flora, landscapes, art and architecture; different landscape displays and exhibition gardens all highlight the beauty and diversity of our Australian landscape.

The bushland at RBG Cranbourne includes one of Victoria’s most precious areas of remnant native vegetation and offers nature-lovers the chance to explore 363 hectares of heathlands, wetlands and woodlands.